35/ 2018- Top of a sudarium

” The sudarium or, a cloth of fine quality to wipe away perspiration, or an ornamental handkerchief which was seldom put into actual use, but was generally carried in the hand as an ornament as was commonly done by people of rank in ordinary life, now formalized as a vestment, in liturgical use from the 12th century reserved for the bishop; the subcinctorium is a related ornamental vestment reserved for the pope.”
– Wikipedia

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a historical textile!
This week we show the top of a sudarium.  A sudarium is the cloth a bishop holds in his hand to protect the staff from sweat and dirt.

This sudarium top is in the collections of Historiska museet, Stockholm, Sweden. Originally it was placed on the staff of Thomas Beckert, the sculpture in the museum, originally from Skepptuna church – not the saint! It’s made out of fine linen with a leather backside ( now gone) and have a lovely woven silk band attached to it. Most likely woven in a rigid heddle.

The fragment dates to 1350-1500

Happy weekend!
/ Amica and Maria

 

18/ 2018- The weekend picture’s

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a  historical textile.

This week we focus on a chasuble in silk from Ösmo church, Södermanland, Sweden. The church is whose oldest parts are from the 1100s, is mostly famous for it’s paintings  made by Albertus Pictor.
The fabric is a silk damask in a pomegranate pattern, from Italy. Now pale red/ pinkish.
It’s decorated with two different tablet woven bands.  The band that is attached to the back of chasuble, in the shape of a cross,  is woven in silk with gold thread in the brocading weft. Green and blue silk is still visible on that band. The band that is attached around the neck line is possibly made from linen and have a gold thread in the brocading weft. We find is quite amusing that the neck band is not at all centered in the front.

The shape of the chasuble have been changed and some material have been cut off. The item shows some interesting piecing and give us an idea that the fabric was once very valuable. There are no traces of pattern matching. The seams shows that the silk fabric was sewn together with back stitches.  One can see the characteristic V-shaped stitches through the gap in between the pieces.
The linen lining is very impressive with it’s dark blue colour. Most likely dyed with woad.

The chasuble can be found in the collections of Statens Historiska museum in Sweden.
Here is the link to the object in the database. The chasuble is dated to mid -to late 15th century.

Happy weekend!
/ Amica and Maria

All images subject to CC BY SA. Photographer: Historical Textiles, specified at sharing of images. Make sure to do the same with the pictures from Historiska

15/2018 The weekend picture

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a historical textile.

This week we focus on a lovely silk embroidery from England. It’s a high class work aka Opus Anglicanum. The embroidery comes from Skå church and is dated  to
1250- 1350 AD. Now in the collections of Statens Historiska museum in Sweden.

Silk on linen. Here we can see a close up on a table cloth. Table cloths of the time were often depicted as woven in goose eye/ twill variation.

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Advent calendar 20 December 2017

Our twentieth calendar post is an antependium in printed linen. From Tegelsmora church , Sweden.

Here we can see a close up on the print. The linen is woven in two shaft.

This piece is undated. But the print shows great resemblance with woven silk fabrics from 14th and 15th century.

Now in collections of Historiska museet, Sweden

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Advent calendar 15 December 2017

Our fifteenth calendar post is a mended shirt. From Forsby church, Sweden.

Here we can see a close up on the patch. The patch is sewn on to the outside of the shirt. Both the patch and the shirt are made in linen.

The item dates to 1250- 1350 AD.

Now in collections of Historiska museet, Sweden

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Advent calendar 12 December 2017

Our twelfth calendar post is a cocktail of things. It’s a relief velvet, a selvage of the velvet, a woven band and a embroidery in gold thread. The object is a cope from Vallentuna, Sweden

The majority of the materials are in silk. The embroidery seems be made on linen or hemp fabric.

The cope dates  1450- 1500 AD.

Now in collections of Historiska museet, Sweden

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