44/2018- The archaeological medieval textile fragments from Swedish cities

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På Historiska museet i Stockholm pågår just nu ett arbete med att förbättra och dela information om de ca 1000 medeltida arkeologiska textilfragment som museet förvaltar. Det innebär att nya bilder fotograferas och fragmenten kommer att analyseras och kategoriseras i visuella grupper, som gör att de blir lättare att prata om olika textilkvalitéer. Bild och analys kommer sedan att föras in i museets databas och bli sökbart. Det kommer dock dröja ytterligare innan det är publicerat eftersom museet byter föremålsförvaltningssystem. Men vi kan inte hålla oss utan kommer börja lägga upp fina nyfotograferade fynd här på vår blogg.

Fyndmaterialet som nu gås igenom kommer från arkeologiska utgrävningar som gjorts framförallt på 1970-talet i olika svenska städernas stadskärnor. En del av samlingen som finns på museet kommer från Enköping, från kvarteret Traktören, och den första textilien som vi visar idag kommer därifrån.

Det arkeologiska medeltida textilfragmenten från våra städer kan delas in i fem grupper
1- borttappade föremål, ex en vante
2 -spill från tillverkning
3 -fragment av utslitna klädesplagg
4 -rester av grövre emballage textil
5 -trådar, filtad ull eller lös ull

Av de ca 1000 fragmenten som finns på museet tillhör en mycket liten del grupp ett.

Fragmentet på bilden är en 2/1 kypert, ull. Fragmentet är mycket slitet så det kommer troligen från ett utslitet klädesplagg eller en inrednings textil som exempelvis en dyna. Idag är textilen ljusbrun och ingen synlig färg framträder. Men om man tittar uppe till höger i bilden syns släppta trådar. Detta indikerar att det här har varit en vävd rand som bundit i tuskaft/ inslagsrips. Dateringen är “medeltid”. Vi placerar denna väv till 1300-talet då den har det karakteristiska ränderna som är vanliga för tiden.
/ Amica och Maria

Foto Ola Myrin, SHM

At the Historical Museum in Stockholm, work is right now being done to improve and share information about the approximately 1000 medieval archaeological textiles that the museum manages. This means that new photos are being taken and the fragments will be analyzed and categorized into visual groups, that will make it easier to talk about different textile qualities. Photo and analyzed result will then be uploaded into the museum’s database and become searchable. However, it will take some time before it is published because the museum is changing the system for the database. But we can’t wait and will start posting nice photos of the finds here on our blog.

The material currently under review comes from archeological excavations made mainly in the 1970s in the city centers of different cities in Sweden. A part of the collection that is found at the museum comes from Enköping, from the quarter of Traktören, and the first textile presented today comes from there.

The archaeological medieval textile fragments from our cities can be divided into five groups
1 – lost items, for an exempel, a mitten
2 – left overs from manufacture
3 -fragments from worn out garments
4 – residue of coarser packaging textile
5 – threads, felted wool or loose wool

Of the approximately 1,000 fragments found in the museum a very small part belongs to group 1.

The fragment is a 2/1 twill, wool. The fragment is very worn, so it probably comes from a worn out garment or an interior textile, like as a cushion. Today the textile is light brown and no visible color is shown. But if you look at the top right in the picture you see some loose threads. This indicates that this textile have had a woven stripe, woven in plain weave/ extended tabby. The dating is “medieval”. We place this fabric in the 14th century as it has the characteristic stripes that are commonplace at the time.

The fabric is what we would describe as an medium quality suitable for an example kirtles and hoods.
/ Amica and Maria

42/2018- Close up Birka

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with some close up pictures of some finds from the excavation from Birka, Björkö, Sweden.

The finds from Birka are world famous. Not only the amazing metal finds with brooches, swords and a lot of bling. But also for some breathtaking tablet woven bands with brocade in both silver and gold. Not to mention the super cool posaments finds attached to hats and other items.

Today we focus on the lovely small pieces of decorative wool textiles. And a lovely deer in gold thread. The first two pictures are both pieces of woven tapestry, the third picture is a brocaded tabby/type “krabbasnår”  and the fourth is the weird deer.

Dating 850- 1000 AD.
We have now over 11.000 followers on our Facebook page and we are super happy that you follow the page and that you share and comment on the posts we add. You all are very precious to us <3

Hugs,
Amica and Maria

 

35/ 2018- Top of a sudarium

” The sudarium or, a cloth of fine quality to wipe away perspiration, or an ornamental handkerchief which was seldom put into actual use, but was generally carried in the hand as an ornament as was commonly done by people of rank in ordinary life, now formalized as a vestment, in liturgical use from the 12th century reserved for the bishop; the subcinctorium is a related ornamental vestment reserved for the pope.”
– Wikipedia

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a historical textile!
This week we show the top of a sudarium.  A sudarium is the cloth a bishop holds in his hand to protect the staff from sweat and dirt.

This sudarium top is in the collections of Historiska museet, Stockholm, Sweden. Originally it was placed on the staff of Thomas Beckert, the sculpture in the museum, originally from Skepptuna church – not the saint! It’s made out of fine linen with a leather backside ( now gone) and have a lovely woven silk band attached to it. Most likely woven in a rigid heddle.

The fragment dates to 1350-1500

Happy weekend!
/ Amica and Maria

 

25/2018- From Herjolfsnes, Greenland

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a historical textile!
It’s late and we have been working hard in the dye pots all day long. But to keep our promise, to give you nice pictures once a week, we just post pictures of a celebrity everyone already know.

From the exhibition at National museum in Copenhagen, Denmark. A children’s kirtle made in wool from Herjolfsnes on Greenland.
Check out the lovely 2/2 twill and the nice front gore. The kirtle is dated to late 14th century ( please tell us if we are wrong- can’t find the book at this hour…) !

Happy weekend!
/ Amica and Maria

SparaSpara

18/ 2018- The weekend picture’s

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with a  historical textile.

This week we focus on a chasuble in silk from Ösmo church, Södermanland, Sweden. The church is whose oldest parts are from the 1100s, is mostly famous for it’s paintings  made by Albertus Pictor.
The fabric is a silk damask in a pomegranate pattern, from Italy. Now pale red/ pinkish.
It’s decorated with two different tablet woven bands.  The band that is attached to the back of chasuble, in the shape of a cross,  is woven in silk with gold thread in the brocading weft. Green and blue silk is still visible on that band. The band that is attached around the neck line is possibly made from linen and have a gold thread in the brocading weft. We find is quite amusing that the neck band is not at all centered in the front.

The shape of the chasuble have been changed and some material have been cut off. The item shows some interesting piecing and give us an idea that the fabric was once very valuable. There are no traces of pattern matching. The seams shows that the silk fabric was sewn together with back stitches.  One can see the characteristic V-shaped stitches through the gap in between the pieces.
The linen lining is very impressive with it’s dark blue colour. Most likely dyed with woad.

The chasuble can be found in the collections of Statens Historiska museum in Sweden.
Here is the link to the object in the database. The chasuble is dated to mid -to late 15th century.

Happy weekend!
/ Amica and Maria

All images subject to CC BY SA. Photographer: Historical Textiles, specified at sharing of images. Make sure to do the same with the pictures from Historiska

17/ 2018 The weekend picture- Fringe frenzy

We would like to wish you all a happy weekend with some  historical textiles.
We would also like to celebrate that we have over 10.000 followers in Facebook.
We could never have thought that there were so many textiles nerd’s out there. <3

This week we focus on fringes on various historical textiles.  All, except one, are woven in silk. The last one is woven in linen.

The fringes are attached to various items all related to church textiles.
The fringes  can all be found in the collections of Statens Historiska museum in Sweden.
The items are dated to 14-17th century.

/ Amica and Maria

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Advent calendar 12 December 2017

Our twelfth calendar post is a cocktail of things. It’s a relief velvet, a selvage of the velvet, a woven band and a embroidery in gold thread. The object is a cope from Vallentuna, Sweden

The majority of the materials are in silk. The embroidery seems be made on linen or hemp fabric.

The cope dates  1450- 1500 AD.

Now in collections of Historiska museet, Sweden

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